Starting October, the San Francisco-based social networking company introduced the labeling feature to tweets related to the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election, to curb spread of misinformation.

(Subscribe to our Today’s Cache newsletter for a quick snapshot of top 5 tech stories. Click here to subscribe for free.)

Twitter on Tuesday said it will display a label if a user hits ‘like’ on a disputed tweet.

The warning message will prompt users to get more information of the tweet before sharing it on the platform, Twitter Support explained in a tweet.

Starting October, the San Francisco-based social networking company introduced the labeling feature to tweets related to the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election, to curb spread of misinformation.

Misleading tweets including officials claiming election win before its being authoritatively called was labeled, and users were directed to the official U.S. Election Twitter page.

Also read | Twitter’s ‘Fleets’ aren’t disappearing after 24 hours

The social networking platform labeled nearly 300,000 potentially misleading tweets between October 27 and November 11. This represented nearly 0.2% of all US election-related tweets sent during this time period, Twitter said in a statement.

Twitter also said more than 450 tweets were covered by a warning message and had engagement features restricted, including limitation on retweeting. The number of Quote Tweets of the labeled tweets witnessed a 29% decrease due to prompts sent by Twitter, the company said.

Twitter also stopped providing ‘liked by’ and ‘followed by’ recommendations during this period. Since this update did not cause a significant change in the spread of misleading information, Twitter reverted the change.

The company also said adding descriptions to trending topics helped stop the spread of misinformation.

A letter from the Editor


Dear subscriber,

Thank you!

Your support for our journalism is invaluable. It’s a support for truth and fairness in journalism. It has helped us keep apace with events and happenings.

The Hindu has always stood for journalism that is in the public interest. At this difficult time, it becomes even more important that we have access to information that has a bearing on our health and well-being, our lives, and livelihoods. As a subscriber, you are not only a beneficiary of our work but also its enabler.

We also reiterate here the promise that our team of reporters, copy editors, fact-checkers, designers, and photographers will deliver quality journalism that stays away from vested interest and political propaganda.

Suresh Nambath



Source link